Sarajevo

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Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Balkan Insight’s Week in Pictures

Swiss skiier Joana Haehlen during the the FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup women's downhill race in the Bulgarian town of Bansko on January 24, 2020. Photo: EPA-EFE/Vassil Donev.

Serbia's Antonina Dubinina mid-competition during the women's short program of the ISU European Figure Skating ​Championships in Graz, Austria, on January 24, 2020. EPA-EFE/Tatyana Zenkovich.

BIRN Fact-check: The Air We Breathe

When is unhealthy air acceptable air? In the Balkans, it depends who you believe: mobile apps or state data.

The quality of air in the region has become a hot topic since the capitals of Bosnia and Serbia, Sarajevo and Belgrade, made the top 10 in the list of most polluted cities on the planet.

British Ex-Peacekeeper Urges Croatia to Cooperate in War Cases

Hector Gullan, a former member of British peacekeeping forces, has sent an open letter to the European Commission and the Council of the European Union, asking them to call on new Croatian President Zoran Milanovic and Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic to address the issue of Zagreb's non-extradition of war crime indictees to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Human Rights Progress Faltering in South and Central Europe: HRW

The latest report from Human Rights Watch, published on Tuesday evening, says that discrimination and violence against minorities, domestic violence, pressure on media and problems with dealing with the wartime past continued to be major issues for Balkan states and Central Europe last year.

Bosnian Capital Chokes “In Own Category” of Air Pollution

The Swedish embassy to Bosnia, a long-time advocate of tougher air pollution action in the country, tweeted that Sarajevo was "in a category of its own" as the air pollution levels on Saturday were so high that categorizing the health hazard level made no sense. It called for urgent action.

Culture of Denial: Why So Few War Criminals Feel Guilty

The denial of war-related responsibility remains prevalent throughout the former Yugoslavia, and some of those who have denied their guilt are treated as heroes in their home countries.

"Someone who admits to his guilt is [seen as] a traitor," said Dusko Tomic, a lawyer from Sarajevo who has defended people accused of war crimes.

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