International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia

Journalists’ Abductions, Killings in Kosovo ‘Not Properly Investigated’

International missions in Kosovo did not conduct proper investigations to establish who abducted or killed journalists and media workers in Kosovo during and after the war, said an investigation launched on Tuesday by the Serbian Journalists' Association, UNS.

If the killed was a protected witness, then this is a rerun of the "Haradinaj" case

If it turns out that Rrustemi, whose death was still a mystery a month ago, was a protected witness before the Special Court of KLA Crimes, it could be said to be a rerun of events from the time when Ramush Haradinaj was accused before The Hague, Sputnik said.

Truth Commission Activists Plan Yugoslav ‘Book of the Dead’

"By refusing to create a joint commission [RECOM], the governments of the post-Yugoslav countries have made another political mistake. We think that the nominal list of victims cannot be abandoned. It is about taking charge of and assuming the responsibility for seeing this task through to the end," Terselic told BIRN.

Arkan’s ‘Tigers’ Unpunished 20 Years after Leader’s Death

On January 15, 2000, Zeljko Raznatovic was having a drink with friends at the upmarket InterContinental Hotel in Belgrade when a man walked up to them and opened fire at close range with a semi-automatic pistol.

Raznatovic - better known around the world as the Serbian paramilitary leader Arkan - was hit by a bullet in the eye, and died on his way to hospital. He was 47.

Culture of Denial: Why So Few War Criminals Feel Guilty

The denial of war-related responsibility remains prevalent throughout the former Yugoslavia, and some of those who have denied their guilt are treated as heroes in their home countries.

"Someone who admits to his guilt is [seen as] a traitor," said Dusko Tomic, a lawyer from Sarajevo who has defended people accused of war crimes.

Former Bosnian Refugee to Become Austria’s New Justice Minister

A Bosnian-born woman who came to Austria as a child refugee will be Austria's new Justice Minister, it was confirmed on Thursday.

Thirty-five-year-old Alma Zadic, a lawyer and member of the Green Party, will also be the youngest Justice Minister in Austrian history and the first to come from an immigrant background.

Kosovo: War Commanders Questioned as Prosecutors Step Up Probes

After his invitation for interview as a suspect, Haradinaj, a former KLA commander, resigned as premier in July.

He has already been tried twice by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague and was acquitted both times, and he insisted that the Specialist Chambers would not undermine the KLA's legacy.

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