Montenegrin government

Montenegrins ‘Can’t Face Truth’ About Dubrovnik Siege: Survey

War damage in Dubrovnik in 1991. Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Bracodbk.

"Around 75 per cent of citizens have heard about the attacks on Dubrovnik, but half of them refuse to answer [when asked] who was to blame for the attacks," said Milos Vukanovic from the Centre for Civic Education.

"People are resurrected"

He stated that the position of the Episcopal Council, the clergy, the faithful and the citizens who participate in the liturgies in that country is to go all the way till the goal is achieved, and that is - the "victory of Christ".

Montenegro is rethinking the Law on Freedom of Religion

EU Enlargement and Neighborhood Policy Commissioner Olivr Vrhelyi said that Montenegrin Prime Minister Dusko Markovic had informed him that the Government was ready to temporarily postpone the implementation of the Freedom of Religion Act.
Multiple sources confirmed to "Vijesti" that Vrhelyi conveyed this message at a meeting with the Montenegrin opposition.

Strasbourg rules there is no ban on the implementation of the Freedom of Religion Act

European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) rejected the request to ban Montenegro from implementing its Law on Freedom of Religion until the Constitutional Court decides on the law's constitutionality or until a deal with the Serbian Orthodox Church is concluded, the Montenegrin Government said.

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