Bank

Turkey's short-term external debt stock at $125.3 bln in July

Turkey's short-term external debt stock stood at $125.3 billion at the end July, according to data released on Sept. 17. 

The debt that must be paid in a year or less climbed 9.7% in July compared to the end of 2020, according to the Turkish Central Bank.

A total of 40.7% of the debt stock is in U.S. dollars, 25.8% in euros, 13.3% Turkish liras, and 20.2% in other currencies.

Central Bank reserves top $120 bln, 1st time since November 2016

The Turkish Central Bank's total reserves rose by $944 million to hit $120.1 billion last week, for the first time since November 2016.

According to weekly money and bank statistics published by the bank, the gross foreign exchange reserves increased by $1.6 billion to $79.6 billion on Sept. 10, from $78.5 billion on Sept. 3.

Raiffeisen Bank to refund to customers any amounts collected in excess

Raiffeisen Bank proceeded to implement the ANPC (National Authority for Consumer Protection) order according to which the management fee could not be included in the interest margin for the restructuring of the loans, and after the restoration of the calculations, the bank will return to the clients any amounts collected in excess, the bank's representatives told AGERPRES.

Banks now charge for what they never did: What are we going to give extra money for?

Last year, due to two moratoriums on loans, but also on interest rates, which are at an all-time minimum, banking sector lost a significant part of its income. On the other hand, many have increased commissions and service costs at the same time, and some have started charging for what they never did.

Turkish banks post $4 bln net profit in January-June

Turkey's banking sector registered a net profit of 33.8 billion Turkish liras ($4 billion) as of the end of June, the country's banking watchdog said on Aug. 5. 

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Total assets of the sector hit 6.7 trillion Turkish liras ($785 billion), up 10.2% from the same period last year, a report by the Banking Regulation and Supervision Agency (BRSA) said.

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