International criminal law

Freed Serbian Police Official Barred from Denying War Crimes

After UN officials repeatedly expressed concerns that freed war criminals have used media appearances after their release to deny atrocities, the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals has barred Serbian police general Sreten Lukic from denying any crimes committed during the Yugoslav wars as a condition of his release.

Bosnian Serb War Criminal Sent Back to Hague Custody from Denmark

The UN's Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals in The Hague has said that Radoslav Brdjanin, who is serving a 30-year sentence for crimes against humanity during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, has been sent back to the UN Detention Unit from prison in Denmark.

Bosnian War Crimes Denial Ban Causes Trial Postponement

A hearing in the trial of four former Bosnian Serb police officers accused of persecuting Bosniak civilians in the Vlasenica area during wartime was postponed on Wednesday because defence lawyers said they did not know how far they could go in defending their clients in light of legislative changes banning the denial of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Bosnia’s High Representative Imposes Genocide Denial Ban

Valentin Inzko announced on Friday that he has imposed an amendment to Bosnia and Herzegovina's criminal code to outlaw the public denial, condoning, trivialisation or justification of genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes when this is done in a way that is "likely to incite to violence or hatred".

Simatović and Stanišić each sentenced to 12 years in prison for war crimes

The media reported that Stanisic and Simatovic were sentenced to 12 years in prison each.
The prosecution proved that the crimes in the indictment were confirmed. The killings and forcible transfers were carried out with discriminatory intent.
The prosecution alleges that the accused participated in the organization of the crimes that took place.

Ratko Mladic sentenced to life imprisonment VIDEO / PHOTO

The Appeals Chamber upheld Ratko Mladic's first-instance verdict in its entirety.
He was sentenced to life in prison for genocide in Srebrenica, crimes against humanity in 15 municipalities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, siege, sniping and terrorizing Sarajevo from 1992 to 1995, and holding members of the UN peacekeeping mission hostage during the NATO bombing.

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