Milan Lukić

Bosnian Serb Ex-Fighter’s Conviction for Mass Killing Upheld

The appeals chamber of the Bosnian state court has upheld the verdict convicting Radomir Susnjar of involvement in wartime crimes in the Visegrad area in June 1992, including the murder of 26 civilians - one of them a two-day-old baby - who were locked inside a house that was then burned.

Tensions Flare as Bosnian Serb Accuses Fellow Ex-Fighters of Massacre

Mico Jovicic, a wartime volunteer fighter for Bosnian Serb forces, told Belgrade Higher Court that all five defendants on trial for the kidnapping and killing of 20 passengers from a train at Strpci station in Bosnia and Herzegovina were at the crime scenes when the offences were committed.

Bosnian Train Massacre Trial: Witnesses Find Convenient Scapegoat

The first year of the trial in Belgrade for the abduction and killing of 20 passengers from a train at Strpci station in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the war in 1993 has heard testimony from relatives of the victims, other passengers, policemen, Bosnian Serb Army soldiers and the defendants themselves, as a fuller picture of the crime more than 26 years ago began to emerge.

Bosnian Serb Ex-Fighter ‘Didn’t Kill’ Bosniaks in Burning House

Radomir Susnjar told the Bosnian state court on Thursday that he felt pity for the victims, but did not participate in the murder of 57 civilians in a house in Pionirska Street in Visegrad in June 1992.

"I do not feel guilty, because I am not the person who did that," said ex-fighter Susnjar.

Bosnian Serb Ex-Official Blames Army Officer for Massacre

Tomislav Kovac, who was deputy interior minister in the Serb-dominated Republika Srpska entity in July 1995, when the Kravica massacre happened, told Belgrade Higher Court on Tuesday that Ljubisa Beara, who at the time was the security chief of the Main Headquarters of the Bosnian Serb Army, was to blame for the killings.

Bosnian Serb Plan for New Police Force Revives Wartime Fears

There were 400 reservist police officers in Visegrad before the war, and the force was multi-ethnic. However, as the conflict began, 183 more officers were recruited by the Serb-run police station in the town.

A number of them had criminal records, said Huso Kurspahic, the former commander of the police station in Medjedja, near Visegrad.

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