Montenegrins

Concern for Rights in Montenegro amid COVID-19 Fight

The country, which has been run by the same party for the past three decades, has a long record of restricting human rights and violating data privacy rights.

Activists fear the government will exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to clamp down further. The government says its overriding priority is to protect the lives and health of Montenegrin citizens.

Montenegrins ‘Can’t Face Truth’ About Dubrovnik Siege: Survey

War damage in Dubrovnik in 1991. Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Bracodbk.

"Around 75 per cent of citizens have heard about the attacks on Dubrovnik, but half of them refuse to answer [when asked] who was to blame for the attacks," said Milos Vukanovic from the Centre for Civic Education.

One Tonne of Cocaine Seized in Venezuelan Waters

One tonne of cocaine was seized aboard the Ares ship in Venezuelan waters.

Montenegrin nationals are arrested, the Montenegrin State Police Service said.

The Office points out that is a result of a multi-month international action initiated by the Montenegrin police in cooperation with the Dutch, British and Serbian police.

Spanish Police Charge Balkan Football Agent With Financial Crimes

Media reports say the manager of Serbian Real Madrid football player Luka Jovic, and his associates, have been charged with money laundering and offences against the public purse in Spain. 

Abdilgafar Fali Ramadani, the German-born Macedonian manager of Jovic, oversaw his transfer from Eintracht Frankfurt to Real Madrid for 60 million euros in 2019. 

Montenegro Bishop and President Trade Blows in Religion Row

Metropolitan Amfilohije, the Serbian Orthodox Church's most senior bishop in Montenegro, has called on citizens not to vote for those who supported the contested Freedom of Religion law in coming elections. 

During a Church-led protest against the law on Sunday, Bishop Amfilohije also again urged the government to withdraw the law which parliament passed late last year.

Emergency order in the Montenegrin Army: "It is clear, those who attend liturgies..."

In addition, members of the Montenegrin Army should exert influence on their family members and discourage them from attending protests against the Law on Freedom of Religion.
This, as Novosti finds out, is only part of an order issued by Brigadier General Dragutin Dakic, Chief of General Staff of the Armed Forces of Montenegro, at a meeting of his staff on February 6th.

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