Podgorica

Djukanovic: Montenegro must have its own church to resist interference from Serbia

Djukanovic, who has been running the country for three decades, spoke about the controversial law on religious freedom, which triggered mass protests of the tens of thousands of believers who regularly take to the streets, a few months before the parliamentary elections in Montenegro.

Week in Review: Old Influencers and New Influences

Buying Influence

China's presence in the Balkans may be nothing new, but the massive increase in its investment in the region is something worth taking note of, as Visar Xhambazi points out in his comment for Balkan Insight. In the simplest of terms, he argues that China has been using its money to increase its influence in the region.

Tensions Rise in Montenegro After Protesters Clash with Police

The rector of the Cetinje school of theology, Gojko Perovic, called for calm on Monday after a series of incidents between police officers and opponents of the new law on religious freedom, who believe the legislation is intended to undermine the role of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the country.

Montenegrin journalists arrested over the news on Djukanovic and a planted bomb

According to the Montenegrin Police Directorate, they are charged with causing panic on Sunday, January 12th, by publishing false news regarding the event in Vila Gorica in Podgorica, without first checking the information in question.
As stated, they will be brought to the State Prosecutor with the criminal complaint in the Basic State Prosecutor's Office in Podgorica.

Serbs March Through Capital Against Montenegro Religion Law

Under the slogan "We won't give up holy places", Serbian Orthodox clergy, right-wing and conservative movements and other citizens marched on Wednesday from the centre of Belgrade to the largest church in the city, the St Sava Church.

During the walk, described as a prayer gathering, traffic in the city centre and the main streets was closed, while the police secured the event.

Pages