Yugoslavia

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Innocence Lost: Childhood Memories of the Kosovo War

It was a snowy day in December 1998 and Besnik Rustemi's family was waiting for their village of Slivove/Slivovo to come under fire.

Rustemi, then six years old, was playing in his neighbours' yard with a friend. Meanwhile, his new rubber boots were waiting for him in his bedroom, ready to be worn whenever his family decided it was time to flee.

Croatia Frees Serbian War Criminal ‘Captain Dragan’

Former Serbian paramilitary commander Dragan Vasiljkovic, alias Captain Dragan, who was convicted of committing war crimes against Croatian civilians and prisoners of war in 1991, was released from Lepoglava prison in northern Croatia on Saturday morning after serving his 13-and-a-half-year sentence.

Autonomy Abolished: How Milosevic Launched Kosovo’s Descent into War

"It was a day for conscience and responsibility," Termkolli told BIRN.

Kosovo's autonomy as part of the Yugoslav federation was granted in 1974 under the leadership of Josip Broz Tito, giving it almost the same rights as Yugoslavia's six republics. Fifteen years later, this was being reversed.

Bora Stankovic passed away

Stankovic is one of the founders of BC Red Star, a Yugoslav national team player and the man who scored the first basketball points in the World Cup history.
Stankovic played for Red Star, Zeleznicar and Partizan during his playing career from 1946 to 1953, while he also served as coach in the BC Partizan.

A Slam Dunk National Brand

Sport is not just a game. It is our lifestyle. Our soul we keep above the competitive outcome. It is our export to the world. Our quality of life that keeps reminding the world who we are, where we stand and what we stand for. Because we don't follow only our passion, we follow our effort. We don't laud athleticism and raw talent, we rely on fundamentals and hard work.

Montenegrins ‘Can’t Face Truth’ About Dubrovnik Siege: Survey

War damage in Dubrovnik in 1991. Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Bracodbk.

"Around 75 per cent of citizens have heard about the attacks on Dubrovnik, but half of them refuse to answer [when asked] who was to blame for the attacks," said Milos Vukanovic from the Centre for Civic Education.

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