Latest News from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Yugoslav ‘Red Beret’ Army Brigades Fought in Bosnia – Witness

Three brigades of the Serb-dominated Yugoslav Army took part in fighting in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1993 and, like the special operations unit of Serbian state security, were known as 'Red Berets', a defence witness in the retrial of two top Serbian state security officials in The Hague said on Thursday.

Bosnia Powerless to Halt Demographic Decline

This is the latest in a series of articles about the demographic crisis facing Central and Southeast Europe.

See also: Bye-Bye, Balkans: A Region in Critical Demographic Decline

"For 25 years I lived in hope," he said. "Now I hate myself because of that."

EU and US Welcome End to Bosnia’s Political Impasse

The European Commission and the United States welcomed on Wednesday an agreement reached within Bosnia's tripartite presidency to appoint a new Chairman of the Council of Ministers - effectively Bosnia's prime minister - more than a year after the country voted in elections.

Balkan War Photojournalists Recall Being ‘Witnesses to History’

US photographers Ron Haviv and Christopher Morris presented some of the most important of their images from the break-up of Yugoslavia in Zagreb on Tuesday evening, with Haviv saying that he went to the Balkan war zone in the 1990s to "witness history" for himself.

Serbia Still Putting Children with Disabilities in Institutions: Report

More than three quarters of children living in state institutions in Serbia are children with disabilities, according to the latest United Nations Global Study on Children Deprived of Liberty.

At 77 per cent, Serbia ranks joint third with Hungary behind Turkmenistan and China in a total of 57 countries analysed.

Bosnian PM Appointed, Signalling End to Impasse

The tripartite presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina appointed Bosnian Serb Zoran Tegeltija as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, effectively the country's prime minister, on Monday after more than a year of wrangling between the three main nationalist parties, Bosnian media reported.

Bosnian Serb Leader Moves to Rein in Serb Opponents

Bosnian Serb lawmakers are to consider changes to the criminal code of Bosnia's mainly Serb Republika Srpska introducing punishment for individuals who fail to comply with decisions of the entity's parliament, a move analysts warned was designed to rein in Serb officials at the state level.

Nobel Defence of Handke Prize Angers Bosnian War Victims

Two Bosnian war victims' groups, the Association of Victims and Witnesses of Genocide and the Mothers of Srebrenica, held a small protest on Tuesday outside the Swedish embassy in Sarajevo to express anger about a letter from the Nobel Committee defending the award of this year's prestigious literature prize to Austrian author Peter Handke.

Kosovo Roma Woman ‘Died in Despair’ after War Rape Testimony

Haxhi Balaj remembers that it was sunny on May 5, 1999, and that his mother Shehrije was trying to find something for lunch for the family.

They had run out of flour, among the many other things they were missing in those difficult days during the Kosovo war.

Third consecutive win for eliminated Greece

Two second-half goals by Petros Mantalos and Kostas Galanopoulos saw Greece come from behind and beat Finland 2-1 in Athens as it completed its failed campaign at the Euro 2020 qualifiers with three wins in a row.

Balkan Coal Power Plants Failing Toxic Emissions Targets

Coal-fired power plants in the Balkans are failing to hit toxic emissions targets and many face imminent closure if they continue to operate at current rates, the Energy Community warned on Monday in its latest report.

Croatia Suggests Police Unintentionally Shot Migrant

A migrant shot and seriously wounded by Croatian police may have been struck by accident, Croatian Interior Minister Davor Bozinovic said late on Sunday, responding to the latest incident that has raised questions about the tactics used by the European Union member against migrants and refugees trying to cross its territory.

Turkish Threat over ISIS Fighters Poses Challenge for Balkans

Burak Bilgehan Ozpek, a professor of international relations at Ankara's TOBB University, said that, like the issue of Syrian refugees and their flow through Turkey to the European Union, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan would use the ISIS fighters as leverage for Western acquiescence to his policy on neighbouring Syria.

Serbia Convicts Bosnian Serb Troops of Killing Prisoners

Belgrade Higher Court on Friday sentenced Joja Plavanjac to 15 years in prison and Zdravko Narancic to seven years for their roles in the killings of 11 civilian detainees at a prison in Bosanska Krupa in Bosnia on August 3, 1992.

Plavanjac was convicted of killing the prisoners and Narancic of helping him.

Montenegro, Italy Turn on Undersea Power Cable

The presidents of Italy and Montenegro ceremonially turned on an undersea power cable connecting the two countries via the Adriatic sea on Friday, making Montenegro a Balkan energy hub at the flick of a switch.

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